ISBN 9781118652527,A History Of Seventeenth-Century English Literature

A History Of Seventeenth-Century English Literature


John Wiley & Sons

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ISBN 9781118652527

John Wiley & Sons

Publication Year 2014

ISBN 9781118652527

ISBN-10 1118652525


Number of Pages 480 Pages
Language (English)
A History of SeventeenthCentury Literature outlines significant developments in the English literary tradition between the years 1603 and 1690. An energetic and provocative history of English literature from 16031690. Part of the major Blackwell History of English Literature series. Locates seventeenthcentury English literature in its social and cultural contexts. Considers the physical conditions of literary production and consumption. Looks at the complex political, religious, cultural and social pressures on seventeenthcentury writers. Features close critical engagement with major authors and texts Thomas Corns is a major international authority on Milton, the Caroline Court, and the political literature of the English Civil War and the Interregnum. A History of Seventeenthcentury English Literature outlines significant developments in the English literary tradition over a fascinating century of change and continuities. After a thorough consideration of the conditions for literary production and consumption in the early seventeenth century, this volume continues with the major dynastic disruption of the end of the house of Tudor and the inception of the Stuart era, bringing with it major shifts in patterns of patronage and significant readjustments in dominant religious and political ideologies. Central chapters deal with the glittering court culture of Charles I (and reactions to it), with the cultural impact of the Civil War, and with the complex challenges the Restoration posed to writers across the political spectrum. It ends with the completion of the Williamite revolution, which reorders cultural relations within the ruling elite, marks a new phase for dissenting writers, alters the nature of press control, and coincides with the transformation of the reading public.

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