ISBN 9780130887023,Discrete-Event System Simulation

Discrete-Event System Simulation

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ISBN 9780130887023
Publisher

Pearson Education Ltd

Publication Year 2000
ISBN-13

ISBN 9780130887023

ISBN-10 0130887021
Binding

Hardback

Edition 3rd
Number of Pages 594 Pages
Language (English)
Subject

Computer software

Appropriate for junior- senior-level Simulation courses in departments of Engineering, Management and Computer Science; or a second course in Simulation.

This text provides a basic treatment of discrete-event simulation, one of the most widely used operations research and management science tools for dealing with system design in the presence of uncertainty. Proper collection and analysis of data, use of analytic techniques, verification and validation of models and the appropriate design of simulation experiments are treated extensively. Readily understandable to those having a basic familiarity with differential and integral calculus, probability theory and elementary statistics. The Third Edition reorganizes, updates and expands coverage to reflect the most recent developments in software and methodology, and adds a chapter on the simulation of computer systems.

Salient Features

NEW - New sections on when simulation is the appropriate tool and not the appropriate tool to use and the future of simulation software.
NEW - Updated material on the properties and operation of current simulation software-Including simulation in C++, the latest versions of the most widely used packages, and features of simulation output analysis software.
NEW - Addition of properties, modeling and random-variate generation from the lognormal distribution.
NEW - Enhanced discussion of p-values and "best fits"- as used in input modeling software, and of input modeling without data.
NEW - Greatly reorganized discussion of output analysis-Clarifies the difficult distinctions between terminating and steady-state simulation, and between within- and across-replication statistics.
NEW - Up-to-date treatment of simulation of manufacturing and material handling systems-Independent of the simulation packages used to simulate them.
NEW - New chapter that focuses on how discrete-event simulation is used in the design and evaluation of computer systems-Emphasizes the hierarchical nature of computing systems, and how simulation techniques vary, depending on the level of abstraction. Topics in model representation and model input are considered, as are examples of simulating a web-server system, a CPU that executes instructions out-of-order, and memory hierarchies.
NEW - Companion Website-Contains software downloads for examples in the book and links to simulation-related web sites.
Simulation-software independent treatment of discrete-event simulation.
Comprehensive coverage-Including modeling and analysis, simulation software, conducting successful simulation studies, and manufacturing, production and computer systems applications.
Accessible to a wide audience at the undergraduate level.
New to this Edition

New sections on when simulation is the appropriate tool and not the appropriate tool to use and the future of simulation software.
Updated material on the properties and operation of current simulation software-Including simulation in C++, the latest versions of the most widely used packages, and features of simulation output analysis software.
Addition of properties, modeling and random-variate generation from the lognormal distribution.
Enhanced discussion of p-values and "best fits"- as used in input modeling software, and of input modeling without data.
Greatly reorganized discussion of output analysis-Clarifies the difficult distinctions between terminating and steady-state simulation, and between within- and across-replication statistics.
Up-to-date treatment of simulation of manufacturing and material handling systems-Independent of the simulation packages used to simulate them.
New chapter that focuses on how discrete-event simulation is used in the design and evaluation of computer systems-Emphasizes the hierarchical nature of computing systems, and how simulation techniques vary, depending on the level of abstraction. Topics in model representation and model input are considered, as are examples of simulating a web-server system, a CPU that executes instructions out-of-order, and memory hierarchies.
Companion Website-Contains software downloads for examples in the book and links to simulation-related web sites.
TABLE OF CONTENTS ; -
I. INTRODUCTION TO DISCRETE-EVENT SYSTEM SIMULATION.
1. Introduction to Simulation.

When Simulation Is the Appropriate Tool. When Simulation Is Not Appropriate. Advantages and Disadvantages of Simulation. Areas of Application. Systems and System Environment. Components of a System. Discrete and Continuous Systems. Model of a System. Types of Models. Discrete-Event System Simulation. Steps in a Simulation Study.

2. Simulation Examples.

Simulation of Queueing Systems. Simulation of Inventory Systems. Other Examples of Simulation.

3. General Principles.

Concepts in Discrete-Event Simulation. List Processing.

4. Simulation Software.

History of Simulation Software. Selection of Simulation Software. An Example Simulation. Simulation in C++. Simulation in GPSS. Simulation in CSIM. Simulation Packages. Experimentation and Statistical Analysis Tools. Trends in Simulation Software.

II. MATHEMATICAL AND STATISTICAL MODELS.

5. Statistical Models in Simulation.

Review of Terminology and Concepts. Useful Statistical Models. Discrete Distributions. Continuous Distributions. Poisson Process. Empirical Distributions.

6. Queueing Models.

Characteristics of Queueing Systems. Queueing Notation. Long-Run Measures of Performance of Queueing Systems. Steady-State Behavior of Infinite-Population Markovian Models. Steady-State Behavior of Finite-Population Models. Networks of Queues.

III. RANDOM NUMBERS.

7. Random-Number Generation.

Properties of Random Numbers. Generation of Pseudo-Random Numbers. Techniques for Generating Random Numbers. Tests for Random Numbers.

8. Random-Variate Generation.

Inverse Transform Technique. Direct Transformation for the Normal and Lognormal Distributions. Convolution Method. Acceptance-Rejection Technique.

IV. ANALYSIS OF SIMULATION DATA.

9. Input Modeling.

Data Collection. Identifying the Distribution with Data. Parameter Estimation. Goodness-of-Fit Tests. Selecting Input Models without Data. Multivariate and Time-Series Input Models.

10. Verification and Validation of Simulation Models.

Model Building, Verification, and Validation. Verification of Simulation Models. Calibration and Validation of Models.

11. Output Analysis for a Single Model.

Types of Simulations with Respect to Output Analysis. Stochastic Nature of Output Data. Measures of Performance and Their Estimation. Output Analysis for Terminating Simulations. Output Analysis for Steady-State Simulations.

12. Comparison and Evaluation of Alternative System Designs.

Comparison of Two System Designs. Comparison of Several System Designs. Metamodeling. Optimization via Simulation.

13. Simulation of Manufacturing and Material Handling Systems.

Manufacturing and Material Handling Simulations. Goals and Performance Measures. Issues in Manufacturing and Material Handling Simulations. Case Studies of the Simulation of Manufacturing and Material Handling Systems.

14. Simulation of Computer Systems.

Introduction. Simulation Tools. Model Input. High-Level Computer-System Simulation. CPU Simulation. Memory Simulation.

Appendix Tables.

Random Digits. Random Normal Numbers. Cumulative Normal Distribution. Cumulative Poisson Distribution. Percentage Points of the Students t Distribution with v Degrees of Freedom. Percentage Points of the Chi-Square Distribution with v Degrees of Freedom. Percentage Points of the F Distribution with ...a = 0.05. Kolmogorov-Smirnov Critical Values. Maximum-Likelihood Estimates of the Gamma Distribution. Operating-Characteristic Curves for the Two-Sided t-Test for Different Values of Sample Size n. Operating-Characteristic Curves for the One-Sided t-Test for Different Values of Sample Size n.

Index.
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