ISBN 9789380658421,HARBART


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ISBN 9789380658421

Westland Publications

Publication Year 2011

ISBN 9789380658421

ISBN-10 9380658427


Number of Pages 150 Pages
Language (English)


Harbart Sarkar, sole proprietor of a business that brings messages from the dead to their near and dear ones left behind on earth, is found dead in his room after a night of drinking with local young men. He has killed himself. Why? Was it a threat to his business which brought him money, respect, a standing in the family, more clients and fame? Or was it a different ghost from his shadow life, where he was constantly haunted by his own unfulfilled dreams and delusions? And as the explosive events following his suicide reveal, as in his life, Harbart remains a mystery in death. Nabarun Bhattacharya?s first novel is a landmark in modern Bengali literature for its unconventional story-telling, uncompromising language and brutal honesty. Arunava Sinha?s equally uncompromising translation brings this classic work of black humour to readers in English. About the Author Nabarun Bhattacharya is a poet, short-story writer and novelist. Harbart, his first novel, won him the Narsimha Das Award, Bankim Puraskar and Sahitya Akademi Award. He has published eight novels and novellas, seven short story collections, three volumes of poetry and some collections of prose. He currently edits the Bengali literary monthly Bhashabandhan. The only child of renowned theatre personality Bijon Bhat- tacharya and writer Mahasweta Devi, he lives in Kol- kata. Nabarun Bhattacharya writes in Bengali. Arunava Sinha translates classic and contemporary Bengali fiction. Two of his recent works are The Chief- tain?s Daughter (Bankimchandra Chattopadhyay) and Three Women (Rabindranath Tagore). His forthcoming works includes When The Time Is Right (Buddhadeva Bose) and Seventeen (Anita Agnihotri). His translation of Sankar?s Chowringhee won the Vodafone-Crossword translation prize for 2007, and was shortlisted for the Independent Best Foreign Fiction prize in the UK for 2009. He lives in Delhi.

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