ISBN 9780198078296,Towards Development Economics: Indian Contributions (1900-1945)

Towards Development Economics: Indian Contributions (1900-1945)

Publisher:

J. KRISHNAMURTY

Rs236 Rs295 20% OFF

Availability: Out of Stock

(+Rs. 49 Delivery Charges)
Free Shipping if total order amount is Rs . 300 or more.
We Accept
ISBN 9780198078296
Check delivery information
 
ISBN 9780198078296
Publisher

J. KRISHNAMURTY

Publication Year 2011
ISBN-13

ISBN 9780198078296

ISBN-10 0198078293
Binding

Paperback

Number of Pages 277 Pages
Language (English)
Subject

Business

As the Indian economy goes through one of its most prosperous yet turbulent times, it seems appropriate to revisit its earliest scholars and advisors. Colonial India produced several professional economists of repute, researching on its economic conditions and development needs. Their contributions have largely been ignored though they had anticipated, in significant ways, recent debates in development economics. This volume showcases these contributions to development economics, well before the subject became a part of mainstream economics in the developed world. It reproduces the works of major Indian economists of the early twentieth century, each contexualized in terms of the contemporary relevance. These early Indian economists covered a range of issues-monetary and fiscal policy, protection, employment and labour market conditions, credit systems, industry, rural economy, women in development, macroeconomic policy, environmental economics, and economic dimensions of political problems-with significance for research, teaching, and public policy. Presented in chronological order to highlight the direction in which Indian economic thinking was progressing at the time, the contributions provide readers with a rare insight into longstanding issues in the economy. About the Author J. Krishnamurty Visiting Professor, Institute for Human Development, New Delhi. He was earlier Professor of Economics, Delhi School of Economics, and Senior Economist, International Labour Office, Geneva.
Scroll