The Invisible Man : Illustrated abridged Classics (Om Illustrated Classics)

Author:

H.G. Wells

Publisher:

OM BOOKS INTERNATIONAL

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Publisher

OM BOOKS INTERNATIONAL

Publication Year 2012
ISBN-13

9789383202997

ISBN-10 9383202998
Binding

Hardcover

Number of Pages 240 Pages
Language (English)
Dimensions (Cms) 19.7x13.8x2.3
Weight (grms) 340

Set in medieval France, this story continues the tale of the three musketeers. Many years after their exploits, the musketeers are wellestablished in society. We see Aramis, who is a bishop now, meeting a prisoner. However, there is no confession to be heard. Aramis is at the root of a conspiracy that could change the course of French history. The fact that the prisoner is the twin brother of the King of France has sealed his fate and destined him to spend the rest of his life in prison. But Aramis has a different plan in mind. Being one of the few to know the prisoner’s identity, Aramis conspires to replace the King of France with his twin brother, with the idea that the prisoner will be a better ruler for France. How will this plan turn out? Will Aramis succeed? When the other musketeers find out about the plan what stand will they take? To find out, read this classic tale of love, politics and loyalty.

H.G. Wells

Herbert George Wells was born at Atlas House, 162 High Street in Bromley, Kent,[13] on 21 September 1866.[4] Called \"Bertie\" in the family, he was the fourth and last child of Joseph Wells (a former domestic gardener, and at the time a shopkeeper and professional cricketer) and his wife, Sarah Neal (a former domestic servant). An inheritance had allowed the family to acquire a shop in which they sold china and sporting goods, although it failed to prosper: the stock was old and worn out, and the location was poor. Joseph Wells managed to earn a meagre income, but little of it came from the shop and he received an unsteady amount of money from playing professional cricket for the Kent county team.[14] Payment for skilled bowlers and batsmen came from voluntary donations afterwards, or from small payments from the clubs where matches were played.
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