The Mill on the Floss :Illustrated abridged Classics (Om Illustrated Classics)

Author:

George Eliot

Publisher:

OM BOOKS INTERNATIONAL

Rs141 Rs199 29% OFF

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Publisher

OM BOOKS INTERNATIONAL

Publication Year 2015
ISBN-13

9789385031526

ISBN-10 9789385031526
Binding

Hardcover

Number of Pages 240 Pages
Language (English)
Dimensions (Cms) 19.7x13.8x2.3
Weight (grms) 340
An American family named Otis moves into an old English mansion called Canterville Chase. The owner, Lord Canterville, warns Mr. Otis about the house being haunted. But that does not deter the family, who do not believe in ghosts. But when the notorious Canterville Ghost makes his appearance, the family is not afraid at all. In a role reversal, the ghost is scared after scaring people for more than three hundred years. The ghost considers it a great insult that the American family is not scared of him. He hates them all, except the teenaged Virginia, who is different from the rest of her family. Virginia encounters the ghost at the end of the novel, and accepts his plea for help to lift the curse on him. At the risk of her own life, Virginia travels with the ghost to another dimension, and helps him to finally rest in peace.

George Eliot

Mary Anne Evans known by her pen name George Eliot, was an English novelist, poet, journalist, translator and one of the leading writers of the Victorian era. She is the author of seven novels, including Adam Bede (1859), The Mill on the Floss (1860), Silas Marner (1861), Middlemarch (1871–72), and Daniel Deronda (1876), most of which are set in provincial England and known for their realism and psychological insight. She used a male pen name, she said, to ensure that her works would be taken seriously. Female authors were published under their own names during Eliot\'s lifetime, but she wanted to escape the stereotype of women\'s writing being limited to lighthearted romances. She also wanted to have her fiction judged separately from her already extensive and widely known work as an editor and critic. Another factor in her use of a pen name may have been a desire to shield her private life from public scrutiny, thus avoiding the scandal that would have arisen because of her adulterous relationship with the married George Henry Lewes.
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