The Picture of Dorian Gray, And, a House of Pomegranates

Author:

Oscar Wilde

Publisher:

Forgotten Books

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Publisher

Forgotten Books

Publication Year 2018
ISBN-13

9781330885994

ISBN-10 1330885996
Binding

Paperback

Number of Pages 444 Pages
Language (English)
Weight (grms) 590
Excerpt from The Picture of Dorian Gray, And, a House of Pomegranates Lord Henry stroked his pointed brown beard, and tapped the toe of his patent-leather boot with a tas seled ebony cane. How English you are, Basil! That is the second time you have made that observa tion. If one puts forward an idea to a true English man - always a rash thing to do - he never dreams of considering whether the idea is right or wrong. The only thing he considers of any importance is whether one believes it one's self. Now, the value of an idea has nothing whatsoever to do with the sincerity of the man who expresses it. Indeed, the probabilities are that the more insincere the man is, the more purely intellectual will the idea be, as in that case it will not be colored by either his wants, his desires, or his prejudices. However, I - don't propose to discuss poli tics, sociology, or metaphysics with you. I like per sons better than principles, and I like persons with no principles better than anything else in the world. Tell me more about Mr. Dorian Gray. How often do you see him?

Oscar Wilde

Oscar Wilde was born at 21 Westland Row, Dublin (now home of the Oscar Wilde Centre, Trinity College), the second of three children born to Sir William Wilde and Jane Wilde, two years behind William (\"Willie\"). Wilde\'s mother was of Italian descent,[1] and under the pseudonym \"Speranza\" (the Italian word for \'hope\'), wrote poetry for the revolutionary Young Irelanders in 1848 and was a lifelong Irish nationalist.[2] She read the Young Irelanders\' poetry to Oscar and Willie, inculcating a love of these poets in her sons.[3] Lady Wilde\'s interest in the neo-classical revival showed in the paintings and busts of ancient Greece and Rome in her home.[3] William Wilde was Ireland\'s leading oto-ophthalmologic (ear and eye) surgeon and was knighted in 1864 for his services as medical adviser and assistant commissioner to the censuses of Ireland.[4] He also wrote books about Irish archaeology and peasant folklore. A renowned philanthropist, his dispensary for the care of the city\'s poor at the rear of Trinity College, Dublin, was the forerunner of the Dublin Eye and Ear Hospital, now located at Adelaide Road.[4] On his father\'s side Wilde was descended from a Dutchman, Colonel de Wilde, who went to Ireland with King William of Orange\'s invading army in 1690. On his mother\'s side Wilde\'s ancestors included a bricklayer from County Durham who emigrated to Ireland sometime in the 1770s.[5][6]
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