THE ORIGINALS THE TIME MACHINE (UNABRIDGED CLASSICS)

Author:

H.G. Wells

Publisher:

OM BOOKS INTERNATIONAL

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Availability: Available

    

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Publisher

OM BOOKS INTERNATIONAL

Publication Year 2018
ISBN-13

9789352766468

ISBN-10 9789352766468
Binding

Paperback

Number of Pages 111 Pages
Language (English)
Dimensions (Cms) 19.7X13X0.8
Weight (grms) 70

It sounds plausible enough tonight, but wait until tomorrow. Wait for the common sense of the morning. Born out of H.G. Wells’ literary vision of the future, The Time Machine (1895) is an extraordinary work of early science fiction. A Victorian scientist builds a time machine and lands in the year 802,701 AD. Initially, he is transported to the pastoral idyll of an unknown land which is delightfully peaceful. Soon, however, the paradisiacal façade shatters and he discovers the reality of two distinct species: Eloi are useless, childlike adults surviving on a fruit based diet and Morlocks who are barbarians thriving underground. The Time Traveller saves one of the Eloi from drowning and navigates through tunnels to retrieve his time machine that has gone missing. Before returning to his era, The Time Traveller also visits a land where a bloated red sun stares motionless in the sky and the only sign of life is a black blob with tentacles. Once again, the scientist prepares to leave on another time travel, but this time will he return?

H.G. Wells

Herbert George Wells was born at Atlas House, 162 High Street in Bromley, Kent,[13] on 21 September 1866.[4] Called \"Bertie\" in the family, he was the fourth and last child of Joseph Wells (a former domestic gardener, and at the time a shopkeeper and professional cricketer) and his wife, Sarah Neal (a former domestic servant). An inheritance had allowed the family to acquire a shop in which they sold china and sporting goods, although it failed to prosper: the stock was old and worn out, and the location was poor. Joseph Wells managed to earn a meagre income, but little of it came from the shop and he received an unsteady amount of money from playing professional cricket for the Kent county team.[14] Payment for skilled bowlers and batsmen came from voluntary donations afterwards, or from small payments from the clubs where matches were played.
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