SILAS MARNER (CLASS XII)

Author:

George Eliot

Publisher:

Prabhat Prakashan

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Publisher

Prabhat Prakashan

Publication Year 2015
ISBN-13

9789351864172

ISBN-10 9351864170
Binding

Paperback

Number of Pages 216 Pages
Language (English)
Dimensions (Cms) 20 x 14 x 2
Weight (grms) 100
Silas Marner: the weaver of Raveloe is a novel by George Eliot, published in 1861. An outwardly simple tale of a linen weaver, it is notable for its strong realism and its sophisticated treatment of a variety of issues ranging from religion to industrialisation to community. The novel is set in the early years of the 19th century. Silas Marner, a weaver, is a member of a small calvinist congregation in lantern Yard, a slum street in an unnamed city in northern England. He is falsely accused of stealing the congregation's funds while watching over the very ill Deacon. Two clues are given against Silas: a pocket-knife and the discovery in his own house of the bag formerly containing the money. There is the strong suggestion that Silas' Best friend, William Dane, has framed him, since Silas had lent his pocket-knife to William shortly before the crime was committed. Silas is proclaimed guilty.

George Eliot

Mary Anne Evans known by her pen name George Eliot, was an English novelist, poet, journalist, translator and one of the leading writers of the Victorian era. She is the author of seven novels, including Adam Bede (1859), The Mill on the Floss (1860), Silas Marner (1861), Middlemarch (1871–72), and Daniel Deronda (1876), most of which are set in provincial England and known for their realism and psychological insight. She used a male pen name, she said, to ensure that her works would be taken seriously. Female authors were published under their own names during Eliot\'s lifetime, but she wanted to escape the stereotype of women\'s writing being limited to lighthearted romances. She also wanted to have her fiction judged separately from her already extensive and widely known work as an editor and critic. Another factor in her use of a pen name may have been a desire to shield her private life from public scrutiny, thus avoiding the scandal that would have arisen because of her adulterous relationship with the married George Henry Lewes.
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